THE COLOUR DOESN’T MAKE THE ROSÉ

THE COLOR DOESN’T MAKE THE ROSÉ

It seems to me that the time has finally come. The sunny days seem to have settled in a sustainable way. So it’s time to take rosé out of the fridge the only real respite from the heat to come! But a question arises: which rosés to choose and how to find your way around?

HOW DO YOU LIKE IT?

Well, I don’t think it’s a secret for anyone: in the summer, rosé should be drunk chilled!

” – Otherwise it’s not good!”

However, the color and region of each rosé will greatly influence the choice of the bottle. For a few years, the lighter a rosé is, the more you will like it! Am I wrong? We then speak about grey rosé (but I come back to it later!)

Rosé can also become very dark and intense! This difference in colour comes from the way the rosé is made…and the type of grape variety used !

HOW TO MAKE ROSÉ?

Excellent question! Thanks for asking. First of all, to make rosé, you cannot mix white wine and red wine (except Champagne, it is forbidden). There are two main families of rosé wines.

THE PRESSE ROSÉ (ROSÉ DE PRESSE)

This wine is made with red grapes but unlike the creation of a red wine, the skins are removed from the grapes. That way, the skins won’t have time to color the juices. Press rosé wines are fine and delicate rosé wines but due to the absence of tannin, these wines cannot be kept for very long in the cellar (1 to 2 years).

These wines are ideal for all your aperitifs and/or to accompany your light dishes (salad, mezze, terrine…).

THE ROSÉ OF BLEEDING (ROSÉ DE SAIGNÉE)

It is a more intense and complex rosé. We start the maceration of the skins with the juices. Unlike a red wine, bleeding rosé wines will only remain in maceration for a few hours (12 to 14 hours for a bleeding rosé / more than 24 hours for reds).

After this short maceration, the winegrower will “bleed” through the cap. This consists in extracting the rosé wine through the skins suspended on the surface so as not to give the juices too much the aromas of a red wine.

Bleeding rosés keep well in the cellar (between 2 and 6 years – see more for some wines). Among them, Tavel, Bandol, Marsannay…

They go wonderfully with your generous and tasty summer dishes: grilled on a wood fire, pizza, cold meats, fresh and/or semi-dry cheese)

THE ROSÉ: IT HURTS THE HEAD!

Then yes! Drinking without thirst of the bad rosé at the edge of the canal could cause (very big) headache.

What you really need to remember is that rosé wine is a fragile wine! And generally, there will be more chemical inputs in a rosé than in a white or red (in conventional agriculture).

I invite you to read the excellent article on organic wines on the blog DesVinsaVous emoticon, happy, reaction, smiley, tongue, wink icon

For my part, I only buy organic (or biodynamic) rosés. They are also, most of the time, much tastier and more delicate. In addition, some trading houses and winemakers do not hesitate to use chemicals to make your rosé even lighter.

And yes! Grey rosé fashion isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

“THE” FAMOUS GREY ROSÉ!

It seems very important to me to clarify an essential point: what is grey rosé?

In fact, the “grey rosé” category has become a bit of a hideous catch-all for quite some time. At the beginning, the expression “grey rosé” comes from a particular appellation: gris de gris.

THE GRIS DE GRIS

To put it simply, it is a grey rosé made with grey grapes (grey Grenache) – and therefore the gris de blanc rosé is made with white Grenache.

And above all, grey grey has an origin. If this mention appears on the label, it will be a Languedoc wine!

If your rosé does not come from Languedoc, it will not be able to claim the appellation gris de gris (idem for gris de banc).

A RETENIR
A “grey of grey” is a “grey rosé” but a “grey rosé” is not necessarily a “grey of grey”!

ANY QUESTIONS?

Here is a short article to mark the beginning of hostilities (by the way it made me thirsty to write this article !blush, emoji, emoticon, happy, joy, love, reaction icon). Don’t forget to always drink good products and you will see that the hard tomorrow will be rarer than with a first prize filled with ice cubes…

Tell me in comment, how you drink your rosé and which one you prefer!

See you soon,

Corentin – DesVinsaVous

SOURCE
http://www.rose-plaisir.com/elaboration-vins-roses.htm

THE COLOUR DOESN’T MAKE THE ROSÉ
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